Living with cloth

#73: It’s not that hard

New Zealand mama, Sam, wants parents to know that it is possible to do cloth nappies, even if you have very little time. Even more importantly, she wants parents to know they aren’t alone; that there’s a community out there ready to support you through the times when parenting can be as hard as being in a crisis. These messages and more she shares on social media, where she hopes the truth will reign over “Instagram reality”. We love her hope for the world of the future – one that is kinder, more accepting and more sustainable. A world where there is no war, love is love and all people are equals.

Living with cloth

#44: Progress, not perfection

This week, we interview a New Zealand mother who, after realising her family couldn’t keep living the disposable lifestyle they had been, created a community to share simple eco tips that are easy, fun, can save you money and, most importantly, help you to live more sustainably. The Great Eco Journey was born, with the motto ‘progress, not perfection’. Juliet shares with us the simple eco solutions she has found for around the home, how she is faring on her ‘buy nothing new for a year’ challenge, and how she threw a children’s birthday party with only one item going to landfill. She also sums up her children’s time in cloth nappies with the prudent advice that reusables aren’t a lot of work, but they are a bit of work – work that is completely justified with the financial and environmental benefits you will reap in return.

Behind the brand

#40: Making change time fun

As a mother to four daughters, Dzintra’s concern for the world she was leaving behind for her children was a growing concern that led her not only to using modern cloth nappies, but to starting her own business promoting cloth nappies and other eco-friendly products to Australian mums. Fluff Mail gives Dzintra an excuse to receive hundreds of nappies every week without a judgy look from her husband in return – a situation many cloth loving mums could only dream. Join us today to find out Dzintra’s advice for combatting the overwhelm that often comes with making the switch to cloth and her best tips for all cloth families.

Living with cloth

#39: You are my people

Courtney is a passionate mama who chooses to contribute to a greener world in a myriad of ways, not the least of which is with reusable nappies. It means a lot to her, she says, and she hopes it will mean a lot to her kids. While Courtney has faced many disgusted and defensive reactions from others about her cloth nappy use, she shares a story of the time a nurse noticed her son wearing cloth and she knew she had found her people. As a nurse herself, Courtney is less than phased by poo, and she shares here many witty morsels about life with a baby in cloth nappies.

Living with cloth

#38: The power of nature

Caring for the environment and raising her children to be independent and critical thinkers go hand in hand for Canberra mum, Ana. Cooking, gardening, constructing and sewing, for example, she says, are all life skills that can be learnt by making eco-friendly choices. Combine those skills with the fact that children who are creative in their younger years tend to develop into adults who have a greater capacity for problem solving, and Ana has her motivation for making sustainable choices. Using cloth nappies is just one of a range of choices Ana hopes will teach her children the world is a precious place full of resources we can help thrive if we are considerate. Read on for Ana’s experiences with reusable nappies and to find out why she extols the power of nature and open-ended play in educating her children.

Living with cloth

#37: It’s good for everyone

Tegan is mum to identical twin boys, Jude and Leo. She is loving life as a full-time mum before she returns to work next year, and that includes the lack of nappy rash that comes with her cloth nappy use. Tegan admits she was hesitant to choose cloth nappies because of the extra washing that comes with two babies; her parents were not. She describes her parents as hippies and says they didn’t even ask if she was using disposables; they just started buying her cloth nappy items as soon as she was pregnant. Tegan shares how she has overcome some of the challenges that come with reusable nappies and her hack for easy nappy changes.

Living with cloth

#35: Eco rabbit hole

I’m not going to lie, today’s interview is long. But Christabel – who describes her house of two adults and two children as ‘loud and messy and fun and vibrant’ – tells so many relatable tales of motherhood with so much wit and charm, I know you are going to love reading her words as much as I did. Christabel lives in Greater Manchester, UK, and describes herself as a fun/ loving/ lazy/ working/ creative/ tired/ ‘anything for an easy life’/ funny/ ‘trying my best but not always getting it right’ mum who is still learning to be kind to herself.

Behind the brand

#32: Around the country with cloth

Today, we welcome Sara, the founder of Earthside Eco Bums, who shares the beginnings of her business and how she hopes to provide the support parents need to find the confidence to give cloth nappies a go. Unlike most businesses, Earthside Eco Bums was formed on the road, on a family caravanning trip around Australia. When parents started flocking to the van to learn more about cloth nappies and how to use them, Sara realised it was time she made more education available. Read on to find out how she managed to start a business whilst on the road with two small children, and for her best advice on making cloth nappies work while travelling.

Living with cloth

#30: Success the second time around

Melissa’s story is proof you don’t need to get it right immediately with cloth nappies. She started using cloth from birth with her son, gave up, then started again when he was 15 months old. Just over a year later, her daughter was born and, this time, her cloth journey has been a continuous one. She credits the cloth community for its help and support in her stronger trouble-shooting ability the second time around. Her advice is to take it one nappy at a time and to try not to become overwhelmed – “at the end of the day they are just nappies”.