#61: Capturing cloth

Today’s interview with Sydney photographer and mother-of-two, Eli, is a reminder that there’s so much worth in joining the cloth nappy world at any stage of the motherhood journey. Eli had recently begun a quest to reduce her household waste last year when she was confronted with empty shelves where the disposable nappies should have been at the start of the pandemic. She took it as a sign to make the switch to cloth for her then 5-month-old youngest daughter. One year on, being immersed in a world of babies and cute cloth butts brings her much joy. Eli is passionate about connecting with and supporting other mothers and women in business, and saving thousands of nappies from landfill.

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#60: Refusing to rush childhood

Today, I introduce you to Stacey, a New Zealand mama of 4 (including 3 in cloth) who says she’s much better at appreciating the smaller things and moments since becoming a mum. Stacey and her family subscribe to a slow and simple lifestyle which, for them, includes being more purposeful in everything they do. Stacey talks about the simple task of changing nappies as an opportunity to be present and connected – an opportunity that became even more meaningful since she made the switch to cloth nappies. Now, she has an array of colours and prints to discuss with her children at change time. Join us for more on Stacey’s philosophy on life and parenting, and to find out how she has found success with cloth nappies after starting three years into the parenting game.

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#59: Focus on what’s important

Just start – you don’t have to be perfect! Leaks are normal! We love the sage advice of New Zealand cloth nappy brand founder, Alexis, and there’s much more to come in today’s interview. Alexis has developed her own version of the “perfect” cloth nappy (stretch was a must), but she continues to advocate for the use of multiple brands, for “there is no such thing as one brand that fits all”. As a midwife and nutritionist, she also advocates for parents following their intuition. We must learn to slow down and focus on what’s important, she says. And one of those important things is the environment. “We have a finite amount of liveable area; we don’t want them inhabitable.”

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